Thursday, September 20, 2007

An Event Horizons of Piracy: Communicating Stories Through the Language of Film












http://www.geocities.com/stokastika1/eventhorizonpiracy.pdf
Above is a pdf file of the "Event Horizons" of Piracy story.

In reflection, what an interesting assignment. I remember the day that Michael Hanrahan passed out in class a very peculiar piece of paper. It was a paper with a Pirate-Hunting Treasure Map... hmmm... something you would give to your cute little five-year-old next door neighbor, I'd say. Yes, we were given something to color and something to draw lines and connect the dots. I think the oldest student in the class was 29 and I was 25 at the time (still feel that way though). Youngest maybe 19 or 20. What can I say? In the end, we may be adults, but it's back to "kids principles" in the end. Back to the roots. Same with Martin Kennedy's sedimentology class in spring of 2006. We had to color in sedimentary layers in a certain type of sequence map. A small group of "grown-up" geologists learning how to hone our coloring skills. Absurdly, comically, pathetically cute.

And so, with our Treasure Map, Michael asked us to create a story, and tell this story with use of the universal "Film Language" (or what I like to call "spacetime reasoning," as applied in film, geology, geography, some elements of physics, and I am now applying to ecology for my research). Michael gave us our "video vocabulary" previously, and so we had to write a script. I became wildly imaginative, and managed to write the story above, "An Event Horizons of Piracy," which was based on the movie Event Horizons, which I watched with Jesse of California Sound Studios about a month before. I obsessed with that movie, mostly with the notion that the closest distance between two points is not a line but a curve and bend in spacetime. This short story I wrote has had so much impact on me the last couple of months that I even invented a song last night about the two-year Event Horizons in my life, now coming to a close:

It's been two long years
Today, who would've known?
That a giant, jagged boulder
Smoothed-out to a rolling stone

The Bent Event Horizons
Of my scattered spacetime
Is coming to a closing
As two points merged on the line

And so these two distant points
Met as [infinitely] close as possible
Let along the entire bent-bent curve
Your mind will have to travel

never give up
never give up
never give up
your ideas

never give up
your ideas
for that's all
you ever had

your only
rolling stone
of spacetime
for the flow
of your mind
that you know
prism smoothed
to rolling stone

never give up
never give up
never give up
your ideas

never give up
your ideas
for that's all
you ever had

even if it takes
an Event Horizons
and a severe
Spacetime Lag

never give up
your ideas
for that's all
you ever had

never give up
your ideas
for that's all
you ever had

for where it begins
is where it ends
is where it begins
all over again

So, yes. Event Horizons has been playing a key role in my mind right now.... I think this is by far one of the most creative assignments Michael has given us. Or maybe it seems unusually creative because it's a "university assignment" merged with child's play. I admit I turned in the assignment late (though I had the rough draft already written). Michael emphasized that nothing has to be in chronological sequence. You can easily jump around in space and time to make an interesting, yet coherent film. And that is exactly what I did. Event Horizons. Warping spacetime. I went from the beginning. Jumped to the end. Skipped the middle. And then the character had to mentally suffer through the drama of all the events in the "middle." Hope you enjoy my short story!

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