Monday, March 30, 2009

404. A First Lecture in Ecological Anthropology, A First and Final Day of School

So... I am starting my first day of the quarter on the "wrong" foot. I found out last moment that Barry Spacks is teaching a "finish your creative writing project" course, and more likely than not I cannot register for units, and I may have to be a "crasher ghost" within the course. I can observe and listen, but not necessarily participate. I am excited about the group. This batch of students looks like the most sincere bunch I have encountered yet in a CCS course. There is one guy in the class who is writing a book about surviving Hurricane Katrina. That is astounding. Glad he's doing it. We have some very lengthy undertakings in the course. We are also watching a film called "Adaptation" with Charlie Kaufman... all about writer's block, starring Nicolas Cage. Errr... Nicolas Cappola, more revealingly and accurately. And? It's a riot act. Charlie Kaufman collaborates with Michel Gondry. And that... was that. Those are my dream peeps. People I am dying to work for. Now... everyone around me is getting on the same page in terms of mentality and vision.

And then after class, I am ansty because I didn't get my full jog. I am sleep-deprived and hyper all at the same time. Just got out of a 11-minute massage. Before I was thinking of TN and CE. Now that JLs around I thought getting this stupid technology-mediated, machine massage was so unfulfilling... nevertheless slowing me down, emptying my mind, and relaxing me. Stupid mammal needing a hug, dxmmit, that's all that I was doing.

I started a poem last night:

I wished my bed were in the shower
I wished I dreamed, bathed under water....
Yet the sheets of cold and arid
Took a drift to heights of desert.

And so I slept
like a half-buried mummy--
in unrest,
folded in unrest.

Everyone is apparently too pregnant in the head to have time to read my writing, eh? So it goes. Barry said in class that we are lucky to engage in the process of creativity, but most times we are too quick to be self judgmental and worry about what other people think, eh?! Ya!!! Just write for yourself, for the sake of writing....

I just came from Dr. Teddy Macker's axe-handle poetry course, which was packed with 20 students, myself included. But nevertheless, a very LIVELY bunch. I introduced myself as Victoria, from the dregs of Los Angeles (Riverside), but half-Greek (did not mention). Currently, I read Rudyard Kipling and Edgar Allan Poe (by accident on the internet, top 500 poems), and been appreciating the sophisticated lyrics of Jack Johnson. Basically, the metaphor of an axe coupled axe handle is used in which we can create new poetry through reading other people's poetry. Once you are given a model, you can create your own model from the fragments of other people's models. The question is, where is the line drawn between plagiarism/stealing versus inpiration/buildingblocks, or taking a piece of other people's work and implementing it in a new creation? That is a good question. For me, most often, there is an issue of independent origin of common thought. I invent something in my head and then I found out someone else already wrote about it. And I'm like, oh. I still feel master of the idea because I cultivated these thoughts in my own terms, though I feel slightly to greatly less original and worthy of much of anything. We read some poems and then we went to the Campus Lagoon to write some poems--mostly in the domain of simple language, intense detail, and trying to have an "ending punch line."

Right now I feel mentally beat up and just want to be left alone. Since I felt drained, I created a "draining" poem.

Bleached

In this bleached light
I do great shame
for not trying
to playing this game
to delve down deep
down spiraled knots
from flickered feathers (when a noisy truck passed by)
of fickle thoughts.

Burn a charred shrub,
Sway a tattered web,
and there exists no means
for novelty in growth.

Basically, I am sooooo beat up. The quarter system is making me depressed. I need to break away. All words are cheap if I am bombarded once again. I need to be brave and let go of all of this, except for visiting Barry Spacks on Mondays and Wednesdays. I am going to go insane. This university mental institute I am in is going to make me go insane.

Barry asked us to vow to writing 15 minutes a day. Well, here I am, writing down all the things that Charlie Kaufman mumbles in his head and never writes down on paper. I write down the dregs. Always will. Because sometimes dregs make stories.

I read the above poem to class, and since no one heard it due to the noisy truck passing by when I was reading, Dr. Macker was kind enough to make note that it rhymed. *Sigh.* The one poem I will remember from the bunch of 20 is that of an Asian student by the name of Richard who was walking to the Campus Lagoon and completely diverged in his train of thought, and it ended up that he wrote a poem about he and his friend texting each other in concern of their stolen skateboards, and that the students were all wanting a nature poem, as if they were on this planet the last 15 seconds of their life, and he ended up reminiscing about his skateboard. Richard even had cus words in his poem. I felt that this poem encompasses the truth about our lives as students on this campus. We were bullshxt fooling ourselves trying to write some fxcking nature poem, and me? Well, I paralleled my emotions with the generic fractal shapes around me, predictable of me. The issue is, I can write the accurate humor of what Richard wrote, and I have done so in the past, but the issue is that I would have never considered this writing as a poem. It was just a journal entry/story. It's a matter of taste. At least the poem I wrote encapsulated my sense of being drained.

So the real kicker of the day is a summary of my life story. I attended the first-ever official "anthropology lecture," held by some stuffy TA with a heavy French accent. Dr. Aswani was not there, so maybe I have to attend one more time this Wednesday. This epic lecture basically summarized WHY I wrote
Question Reality: An Investigation of Self-Humans-Environment, because right now, all these different fields and disciplines of the university are merging in perspectives (most notably social and natural sciences), but no one is streamlining any of the logic or knowledge. Everyone remains with their pet pea hypotheses in their respective cult disciplines--it's all the same even though it seems different, but no one is ready to acknowledge that, as indicated by this lecture. Essentially the university needs to streamline itself because redundant classes exist among ecology and evolution, earth science, geography, environmental studies, anthropology, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. It's tragic. I'm sure even the undergrads are detecting a sense of redundancy.

The French chic TA recited 18 different perspectives with anthropology and ecology, and it is simply INSANE CONVERGENCE with NO CONSOLIDATION. Consider the entire university a software engineering program that is willing to synthesize but not consolidate efficiently. I didn't know a few of the "academic cliques" that were mentioned, and there were other "buz words" I know of that the temp teacher didn't mention. She also misused the words "habitat," "niche," and "adaptation." She defined adaptation so badly that I am sure my evolution professor would have yelled at her if he were in the room, and if he were in his teens, he would have shot her with a beebee gun. The adaptation definition was totally teleological. There evolves a trait--"adaptation"--or purpose, is assigned retroactively, it is chance that there is a function to the context of anything. Sheesh!

Disciplines that study the interactions between humans and their environments:
Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (NSF)
Coupled Human-Environmental Systems (CHESS, this is MINE, the synthesis of petty redundancy)
sociobiology (evolutionary psychology) (EO Wilson?)
panarchy / ecological economics (Holling)
evolutionary social constructionism
socioecology
social ecology
physical / biological / cultural geography
ecological anthropology
environmental institutions
human dimensions of environmental change (my advisor Oran's research)
common pool resources (indigenous knowledge and environmental decision-making, scale issue)
environmental determinism (environmental conditionality)
environmental possibility (The Serenity Prayer Poem, engineers' research degree of freedom-constraint, he's at Duke, what's his name?)
cultural ecology
cultural evolutionism
environmental sociology (Dr. Freudenberg)
ethnoecology (conceptualizing the environment, definitions, classifications)
cultural materialism (production of materials, development, social relationships)
"ethnic processes"
systems ecology (funk daddy complex math models)
evolutionary ecology (the Botanist from EEMB?, Susan Mazer?)
political ecology (e.g. tracing the food on your dinner table plate)
historical ecology (land use history, coupled long term human-environmental change)
spiritual ecology (interface of religion and ecology, institutions-fads, codes of ethics, assumptions) radical ecology (environmental disaster and human disaster)
deep ecology / green ecology (stuff covered in Flmstudies 183 films of the human and natural environment, Naess, tenants of deep ecology, not in complete agreement)
ecofeminism (the role of women in human-environmental change)
ecopsychology (ecology and human psychology)
environmental anthropology
post-modernist ecology (I think I am one of this, the notion of objectivity is moot, humans are a part of the system, GONZO SCIENCE, construction of objective reality is moot, it's all relative, in non-traditional publishing means)
metaphor and scale (that's me!)

[INSERT MORE DISCIPLINES HERE]

So, as I said before, I look at this list and I feel three things: (1) I am thankful I wrote Question Reality because now I have a straight head and understand all the assumptions and what fits where regardless of the absurd compartmentalization of disciplines, (2) I feel sorry for the undergrad students who have to memorize this bullshxt rather than use their intuition to synthesize the assumptions behind all the jargon, and (3) this lecture saved a LOT of legwork for me in terms of knowing the "search terms" of the literature, so THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! I should show Oran this list and see how he responds, and this should be a part of a film script on the natural history of the university. Academics married their minds to the literature, not to reality of experience or intuition. In short, this is the most pathetic, humorous lecture I have ever heard. The summation of academic absurdity. This lecture is basically solid script material for a movie on graduate students and where they fit in the university and the world in general. It's all about how you approach the human/environment problem... just like Hollywood, as I said before. So, this is probably one reason why I'm going insane.

Other than that, this UCSB campus is still a ghost town, though it's the first day of spring quarter, 2009. Everyone is having one more day in Cancun or chillin' with their parents, or more likely their hometown friends. Everyone is "over it," including myself. Spring quarter sucks, unless you know you are graduating in June.

This morning Barry went through a series of "writing wisdoms" in the process of creativity. Here are a few that I remember, but I'm sure I'll add more later.

**Writing requires sadistic isolation in space and time. Virginia Wolf, a room of her own. You are around people, you are collecting data, when you are writing your Ph.D. you now have to process and organize all this information into a very condensed stories.

**Mark Twain said that "adjectives and adverbs" were evil. And I say, NO. You know what? No flipping way. I think that's what makes my EOT story different from the dry drone of most writing. I see the world in hypersaturation (when I'm not drained), and I think that adjectives and adverbs add precision and emotional dimensions to the activities.

**Jealousy breeds creativity. An ape, chest-beating stand-up show. I admit to that. That's the only ape-beating thing I can actually do! (from Teddy Macker)

**Tom Clancy. "The difference between fiction and reality. Fiction has to make sense." Consistency of emotions, logic, space, and time.

**V.S. Naipaul. "I have trusted to intuition. I did it at the beginning. I do it even now. I have no idea how things might turn out, where in my writing I might go next." Barry Spacks adds, "My poems are smarter than I am." The genius of fleeting creativity--1% inspriation and 99% perspiration.

**Gloria Steinem. "Writing is the only thing that, when I do it, I don't feel I should be doing something else." Barry adds, "Writing requires full consciousness, full attention."

**"Being famous is a luck thing. But the one opportunity in life I would always crave to have is to be creative." (Barry Spacks quote)

39 comments:

Victoria said...

Other terms.
Human-dominated ecosystems.
The Anthropocene.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Written to Mike Davis: There's a whole series of programs that are just rehashes of traditional perspectives of synthesized social/natural sciences from geography fields. Here's some current buz words--are you familiar with these? "ecosystem-based management" "dynamics of coupled natural and human systems" (NSF program) "socioecology" or "social ecology" and a book called "Panarchy" by Gunderson and Holling. I find this whole hot-trendy-word outburst as appalling in terms of all these isolated groups forming their own jargon of exactly the same thing that already existed before! It's absurd!

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another term. Ecosystem-based management.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another term... "ecological economics." And another term... "environmental history."

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another one... "Ecocriticism. Ecocritique." My golly.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another one. "Environmental History, or historical ecology--I think is already listed. Same for landscape history." OMG!

If I make a little film on ecopistemology, basically, I will state, that truth will survive the test of time, but the truth of the now is determined by those who yell loudest. AAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!

Grad students in chronic bad dreams of carving out their intellectual identity. They have entered the university, not only in a budget crisis, but in a crisis of cumulative compulsive hording of illusive terminology that means ALL THE SAME THING. Compulsive hording of the jargon jungle, spending way too much time unveiling the cloaks different disciplines have placed due to vague abstract terminology.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Undergrads equally in bad shape. Taking classes appear all to have redundancy. Of course no one is interested in streamlining thinking--streamlining courses, because ES 1 and geography 1 and anthro 1 are too similar in content? Streamlining would eliminate jobs... Who wants synthesis when their specialist careers are at stake. Folks you all look like idiots. You're all doing the same thing, and you're the most inefficient sustainability production company I have ever seen. Hollywood wood fire the university as a production company for sustainability or advancing society. As a whole, in its coordination, not necessarily in its specialized parts.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another set of terms, nature-culture divide. Nature = culture? Culture is a subset of nature? Mutual exclusion or pantheism?

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

MORE = difference between economics and ecology, "biocentrism" (family tree phylogeny of Darwin) or "ecocentrism" as opposed to "egocentrism," or what about technocentrism and geocentrism? transcendentalism, romanticism, blah blah blah... behavioral ecology, optimal foraging, sociobiology, evolutionary psychology, evolutionary social constructionism = compromise of genes plus environment, "nature's economy" is the old term pre Haeckel, evolutionary economics, evolutionary history, ecological history, human dominated ecosystems, biological determinism, environmental sociology, ecocriticism, ecocritique, environment of evolutionary adaptiveness...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

More and more and more... natural resources science and management... ecopsychology... environmental psychology... look up the undergraduate majors list at UC Davis!!!

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Performance Studies with human-environmental relationships.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

More... environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, philosophy of ecology, social ecology, socioecology, socialecological systems

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

EBM was preceded by "Integrated Coastal Management" or ICM by coastal management folks. Conservation Biology perceived Crowder normative science as "clinical ecology." Like doctors check ya got a boo boo how to fix it.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another one! Yet another!!! Social folks play chess with "ACTOR NETWORK THEORY"!!! Ahhh!

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

A few more terms. "Cultural geography." Norms distributed about in space. "Cultural landscapes." From Environmental History Course. Vic invented "Integrated Human Environmental Systems IHES" and the IGERT from UCSB is modified to IHEPS, which is unfortunate because the "P" makes it sound like a disease.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Huge dilution of literature concerning coupled human-environmental systems. Everyone is accusing everyone else that they perceive humans separate from the system (not discipline specific) and some of them accuse others for having no sense of history, and other accuse others for being "pastoral" and "unrealistic" and that you have to factor in modern socioeconomics. (This paper is from Campbell and Shackeroff 1994, who made a dichotomy of SBSers and SESers). Then I read Wapner who used the term "the end of nature" that humans have impact on all systems, but he also used the word "social constructivist ecocriticism" which means that the environment is a construct of your mind, and then he creates his own ethnobiological classification of environmentalists, with the extremes of "naturalism" or "adaptation" to "technocentrism" or using technology to solve problems, and that we should ultimately walk the middle road of AMBIGUITY, but it should be a CERTAIN AMBIGUITY. It's not good to be uncertain or ambivalent, but it's important to be certain about your PARADOXICAL AMBIGUITY of life. Humans impact the landscape by default. So, we live as paradoxical hypocrites by default. We are "eco-engineers" intentionally or unintentionally, whether we like it or not.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Consilience is a different approach. Viewing biology and evolution as the answer to human nature which dictates human culture. I would call it biological or evolutionary determinism. They have more fixed perspective on how biology dictates the environment and human societies rather than a feedback between humans and environment. It's more of a one way street and provides agency to genes. It's the nature-nurture debate. Of course, we come into the world with some pre-requisite programs, but the innate or "stubbed wiring" grows through experience and environmental interaction, so that nature-nurture is a chronic evolution. So there are two points of view in terms of translating biology into social sciences. One is the evolutionary approach, natural selection approach toward the production of human nature, which produces culture (evolutionary psychology included), and then there's the ecocriticism approach or how humans construct the environment and induce environmental change. So a camp of biologists focus on "inner human nature" and a camp of environmental scientists, ecologists more so emphasis "outer nature" or human-environment interactions. Inner human nature studies is more important to understanding universals of experience and generation of art, narrative, experience of the primal emotions, fear, arousal, etctera.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Evolutionary social constructivism, which is the understanding that human nature is not fixed and there is a dynamic evolution between innate aspects of humans with environmentally-induced changes. Then there's epigenetics, which is a whole can of worms there too (mice and fatness). I think there is more evidence for innate fixation, or child's critical period, which lock certain concepts or values into the child's head, like my liking my mother's athletic legs when I was three years old. I think that "the more innate wiring that we came packaged with" when we popped out of our mothers is chronically modified and shifted by environmental exposure and experiences, but there are frames and constraints. For example we all experience emotions such as fear, arousal, happiness, sadness, shock, but the issue is that these emotions are expressed differently in different circumstances by different people, based on their unique historical inventory of experiences. The question should be posed as a two-way street, how does nature influence nurture, and how does nurture influence nature and how can this be constructed as an interactive feedback rather than a one-way street?

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

I had my old terms in Question Reality, like HECE and OECE, coupled human-environmental systems. Human-Environmental Coupled Evolution. I don't call it that anymore. And I can't say Question Reality anymore either, because the connotation is 1970s hippi stoners and tweakers who were rebeling the world by wearing funky clothes and stoning and tweaking on a couch on the street protesting... so uh... that's not good.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Issues of Darwinian versus Lamarckian evolution. Darwinian is more deconstructionist and weeding out, and Lamarckian is more constructivist, building upon things, inheritance. Myth of Sisyphus, plus innovation.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Dr. Eugene Anderson was a "cultural ecologist."

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Some more words. Adaptive management implies simultaneous adaptation and manipulation-manicure-control... Couple more words that came to my mind... "landscape architecture--versus landscape ecology or landscape planning" Cultural ecology versus ecological anthropologiest, versus cultural geographer, what in the fxcking hxll is the difference? environmental history and landscape history is appparently the same as well...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another word... solipsism... the environment is a construct of your mind... ecological imperialism... how about "environmental historiography" social theory, self-referential, retrospective, not predictive... life only makes sense in retrospect, not unfolded in the making... Shifting Baseline Syndrome... Environmental History... in fishing, it's called "reading the conditions," environmental possibilism

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Another word... "industrial ecology" which is more of an engineering approach to "political ecology." We have a couple at Bren... I'm starting to feel like I'm becoming an environmental "linguist" but by accident... my attempt to conceptualize the "jargon jungle" so to say... and then I'm accidentally an "ethnobiologist of environmentalism." (studying how any environmental-related profession classifies other environmental people." As I told Peter Alagona, like, I might as well just study a "pencil" for my Ph.D. It would be a great cartoon, but that's not what I want to study (entirely). The world is shaky when you have shaky and shady definitions that are not coherent enough...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

"Biogeochemistry" is sort of metabological in thinking...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Dr. John Melack called this problem the "Tower of Babel" effect.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

More words from the ecocriticism folks (of all people), media ecology (Ursula Heise), literary ecology, pastoral ecology, regionalism, human ecology, urban ecology

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

besides media ecology, they call it post structuralist ecoogy, postmodern ecology... gawd...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

I was looking up "deep ecology" on the internet, and I ran across another giant jarble of words. The main issue is that deep ecology states that non-human life has a value of existence independent of human value... but there is no such thing of "independence of human value." The pathetic fallacy is the simultaneous consideration that the environment does really exist independent of your humanly conscious experience, but is also your mental construct. Wikipedia said it was bout personification and anthropomorphism. All the centrisms... biocentrism, ecocentrism, geocentrism, enthropocentrism, astrocentrism, ocean-centrism, anarcho-primiticism, ecopsychology, human environment reciprocity or co-evolution, eco-communalism, environmental marxism, ecotropism, tropism is a "turn toward," (affinity, magnetism), eco-poetics, chemotropism, heliotropism, geotropism, gravitropism, hydrotropism, thermotropism, thigmotropism, host-tropism, cell-tropism, amphotropism, neurotropism, Earth liberation, environmental psychology, ecotheology, Gaia-Medea, growth fetish (gross national happinesss, more stuff no equal more wealth), Clive Hamilton states that the pursuit of growth has become a fetish, in that it is seen as a universal magic cure for all of society's ills. Hamilton also proposes that the pursuit of growth has been at a tremendous cost in terms of the environment, erosion of democracy, and the values of society as a whole, as well as not delivering the hoped for increases in personal happiness. One result is that we, as a society, have become obsessed with materialism and consumerism. Hamilton's catchphrase "People buy things they don't need, with money they don't have, to impress people they don't like" neatly sums up his philosophy on consumerism. Hamilton adapted the term Eudemonism to denote a political and economic model that does not depend on ever increasing and ultimately unsustainable levels of growth, but instead (page 212) "promotes the full realisation of human potential through ... proper appreciation of the sources of wellbeing", among which he identifies social relationships, job satisfaction, religious belief for some, and above all a sense of meaning and purpose. The relative self or called "Transpersonal Ecology" To this he contrasts the stance of the "transpersonal ecology" described by Warwick Fox: this is "centred on the notion that only the ego-involved, contracted self can imagine itself to be distinct from the natural world and that expansion of the self beyond the boundaries of the personal necessarily means that one's awareness, and ground of concern, extends to the natural world" (page 194), New Economics, Center for the New American Dream, "sustainable development," landscape ecology versus landscape planning, environmental planning, neotribalism (like geologists?), negative population growth, ecopistemology--put "eco" in front of anything and you have a neologism! permaculture, systems theory, the revenge of gaia, Voluntary Human Extinction Movement, anti-humanism, Vulnerability and Resilience, biocomplexity in the environment, prescipriptive conservation medicine, ecosophy, first and second nature (William Cronon), neo-malthusian arrogance

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Deep ecology has religious affiliations and not necessarily an evolutionary-ecological point of view, anti-humanism, Deep ecology provides is with no approach for responding to, much less acting upon, this key question. It not only rips invaluable ideas like decentralization, a nonhierarchical society, local autonomy, mutual aid, and communalism from the liberatory anarchic tradition of the past where they have acquired a richly nuanced, anti-elitist , and egalitarian content---reinforced by passionate struggles by millions of men and women for freedom. It reduces them to bumper-sticker slogans that can be recycled for use by a macho mountain man like Foreman at one extreme or flaky spiritualists at the other. These bumper-sticker slogans are then relocated in a particularly repulsive context whose contours are defined by Malthusian elitism, antihumanist misanthropy, and a seemingly benign "biocentrism" that dissolves humanity with all its unique natural traits for conceptual thought and self-consciousness into a "biocentric democracy" that is more properly the product of human consciousness than a natural reality. Deep ecology provides is with no approach for responding to, much less acting upon, this key question. It not only rips invaluable ideas like decentralization, a nonhierarchical society, local autonomy, mutual aid, and communalism from the liberatory anarchic tradition of the past where they have acquired a richly nuanced, anti-elitist , and egalitarian content---reinforced by passionate struggles by millions of men and women for freedom. It reduces them to bumper-sticker slogans that can be recycled for use by a macho mountain man like Foreman at one extreme or flaky spiritualists at the other. These bumper-sticker slogans are then relocated in a particularly repulsive context whose contours are defined by Malthusian elitism, antihumanist misanthropy, and a seemingly benign "biocentrism" that dissolves humanity with all its unique natural traits for conceptual thought and self-consciousness into a "biocentric democracy" that is more properly the product of human consciousness than a natural reality.

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Deep ecology provides is with no approach for responding to, much less acting upon, this key question. It not only rips invaluable ideas like decentralization, a nonhierarchical society, local autonomy, mutual aid, and communalism from the liberatory anarchic tradition of the past where they have acquired a richly nuanced, anti-elitist , and egalitarian content---reinforced by passionate struggles by millions of men and women for freedom. It reduces them to bumper-sticker slogans that can be recycled for use by a macho mountain man like Foreman at one extreme or flaky spiritualists at the other. These bumper-sticker slogans are then relocated in a particularly repulsive context whose contours are defined by Malthusian elitism, antihumanist misanthropy, and a seemingly benign "biocentrism" that dissolves humanity with all its unique natural traits for conceptual thought and self-consciousness into a "biocentric democracy" that is more properly the product of human consciousness than a natural reality. What we must do today is return to nature, conceived in all its fecundity, richness of potentialities, and subjectivity---not to supernature with its shamans, priests, priestesses, and fanciful deities that are merely anthropomorphic extensions and distortions of the human as all-embracing divinities. And what we must enchant is not only an abstract nature that often reflects our own systems of power, hierarchy, and domination, but rather human beings, the human mind, and the human spirit that has taken such a beating these days from every source, particularly deep ecology. Deep ecology, with its Malthusian thrust, its various centricities, its mystifying Eco-la-la, and its disorienting eclecticism degrades this enterprise into a crude biologism that deflects us from the social problems that underpin the ecological ones and the project of social reconstruction that alone can spare the biosphere from virtual destruction. We must finally take a stand on these issues---free of all Eco-la-la---or acknowledge that the academy has made another conquest: namely that of the ecology movement itself. Deep ecology is so much of a black hole of half-digested, ill-formed, and half-baked ideas that one can easily express utterly vicious notions like Foreman's and still sound like a fiery radical who challenges everything that is anti-ecological in the present realm of ideas. The very words deep ecology, in fact, clue is into the fact that we are not dealing with a body of clear ideas but with a bottomless pit in which vague notions and moods of all kinds can be such into the depths of an ideological toxic dump. http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/bookchin/socecovdeepeco.html

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Okay, so here's a few more... "ecosophy" the idea of "animate versus inanimate" or "adaptive co-management," more stuff... "dialectical landscape"

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

Tragedy of the Commons (Hardin), Tragedy of the Disorganized (Ostrom), Tragedy of the Oversimplified (Saint Martin), Jaime says that the Tragedy of the Commons is basically a paper that exists to critique because the paper is SOOO totally off... Ostrom says there are no "scale-dependent" phenomenon? everything is scale-dependent! mostly...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

bioeconomics... oh ya... don't forget that...

Victoria "Stokastika" said...

and yet another one... ecological architecture... life is beautiful in the war of the words...

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